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Balustroid Stems

Georgian balustroid wine glasses are the stylised 18th century descendants of the baluster glasses, but with more elongated and some would say elegant forms. They are lighter in weight and have a wider diversity of bowl shapes than balusters. To my eye they are amongst the most beautifully balanced glasses ever made with a simple understated elegance.

You may read elsewhere that the stimulus to develop the balustroid was the glass tax introduced in 1746 by Henry Pelham’s Whig government. This is completely unrelated to the earlier “window tax” of 1696 which purely by coincidence is the year that Sir George Barclay’s Jacobite assassination attempt was made on the life of the usurper William 111 in Kew. No Stuart King would have taxed “light” and definitely not drinking. I digress.

Following the introduction of the glass tax products were taxed according to their weight. The assertion that balustroids developed as a result is a fallacy. Some balustroid glasses pre-date the introduction of the glass tax by twenty years and possibly more. Pure hollow stem glasses, not just extended tears and the engraved “No Excise “ glasses can be attributed to the Glass tax more readily and obviously.

I also do not entirely subscribe to the view that the smaller more elongated balustroid glasses were a result of increased demand and were correspondingly speedier to produce. We have placed balustroids into the safe hands of collectors with multiple complex knops above and below a plain stem.

The knops are smaller than balusters and they did start to disappear almost altogether with the vogue for plain stems and later “twists”. But if speed of production and simplicity were the sole commercial drivers how can anyone explain the Newcastle light balusters whose production spanned the introduction of the glass tax and whose complexity in both multiple knops and engraving is unsurpassed.  

Two piece drawn trumpets on plain stems were made before and after the glass tax. Commercial considerations alone never totally overcame aesthetic ones in Georgian glass production, despite the government !

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Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

An outstanding Georgian balustroid wine glass. See more antique wine glasses for the Scottish online antique store

£450.00

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

An outstanding hand formed antique balustroid wine glass. The balustroid fevolved from the baluster form, the stem became simpler and lighter which also made the glass more cost and tax efficient . Antique wine glasses from an antique shop online

£350.00

18th Century Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

18th Century Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

An outstanding balustroid wine glass from the first half of the 18th century. Fine antique stemware

£295.00

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

An antique wine glass with a balustroid stem.

£150.00

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

A wonderful Georgian balustroid wine glass from the first half of the 18th century

£375.00

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

Antique wine glass with a balustroid stem. The form is definitely English, contrary to popular belief, not all English glass is lead glass

£270.00

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

A hand made antique balustroid wine glass for sale

£495.00

Engraved Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass  c1740

Engraved Georgian Balustroid Wine Glass c1740

An engraved antique balustroid wine glass. A glass from the reign of George II, the last British monarch to personally lead troops into battle at the Battle of Dettingen on the 27th of June 1743 during the war of the Austrian Succession.

£210.00

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