Welcome visitor you can login or create an account.

Art Deco

The Art Deco movement was a groundswell of ultimately worldwide design innovation which spread from its epicentre in France across Europe and North America in the years following 1910. It was an artistic melange of styles across multiple media and disciplines, all with the common underlying impetus of modernity and innovation.
 
Initially known as “style moderne” the Art Deco name was coined after the 1925 Paris Exposition des Arts Decoratifs et Industrial Moderne, although with regard specifically to glassware it was the wider European community which embraced the Art Deco ethos to more notable effect than home-grown craftsmen. Lalique, Daum, Marinot and Henri Navarre all exhibited undeniable influences from the Art Deco oeuvre, but their work was sufficiently wide ranging as to preclude being pigeonholed just under this one label.
 
Rather surprisingly given the usual narrative of insularity and isolationism, it was across the channel in Britain that Art Deco glassware became a more readily identifiable movement. Existing manufactories such as George Davidson’s Flint Glass Works began to produce the colourful whorls and convolutions of cloud glass – and later opalescent jade glass in its distinctive green shade. Sowerby’s Gateshead Glassworks, already renowned for the production of milk glass, started to use colour with more creative flair in their Carnival glass range, and the nearby Wear Flintworks moved away from their signature clear crystal work and drew heavily on Lalique’s designs for inspiration. Even the bluff, usually uncomplicated workmen of Bagley & Wild’s Knottingly Works in Yorkshire were sufficiently enthused to create figurines, lamps and vases incorporating geometric linear fan patterns in partly iridescent finishes which gave rise to some iconic Art Deco forms.
 
Further afield, the same story of production facilities taking on board Art Deco influences would be repeated. The Stolze company – extant since 1805, and with premises across central Europe – dedicated a facility at Heřmanova Huť in what is now the Czech Republic for the creation of pieces suiting the new style, almost entirely replacing its former pattern books of pressed glass specialities.
 
Walther & Sohne’s Dresden (Germany) factory followed a similar route, moving from pressed glass production to output with a style approximating Davidson’s cloud glass material, alongside more conventional table centrepieces, bowls and vases in whole-coloured opalescent finishes. The nearby Brockwitz factory turned out a form of carnival glass between the wars, with a predilection for clear, pink or amber wares that were a little more ornate than other contemporary pieces.
 
Other Czech and Yugoslavian concerns (Libochovice, Schweig & Muller, Nemšová, Abel) would also help to further spread the influence of Art Deco patterns and forms, and even the Cambridge (Ohio) Glass Company were to fall under the remit of the movement with their signature amber, uranium green and marbled blue figurines and candlesticks signalling the spread of ideas to the other side of the Atlantic and the true globalisation of the movement.
 

Read More

 
Six Large Signed Moser Amethyst Wine Goblets c1915

Six Large Signed Moser Amethyst Wine Goblets c1915

A set of six matching amethyst wine glasses by Moser Karlsbad

£960.00

Art Deco WMF Ikora Glass Bowl c1930

Art Deco WMF Ikora Glass Bowl c1930

Art deco glassware from Germany online

£150.00

Three Webb Corbett Wave Pattern Decanters By Irene Stevens c1955

Three Webb Corbett Wave Pattern Decanters By Irene Stevens c1955

Art deco decanters by Webb Corbett, fantastic collectors items

£200.00

Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

Daum were the leading light amongst those glass producers using deco style

£525.00

Art Deco Pierre D'Avesn Glass Vase For Daum Freres 1931-6

Art Deco Pierre D'Avesn Glass Vase For Daum Freres 1931-6

Pierre d'Avesn was born in 1901 and worked at Rene lalique from the age of 14. During his time at lalique he designed such pieces as the serpent vase and the Tourbillons vase. He is now regarded as one of the most important designers in France.

£295.00

Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

Daum were the leading light amongst those glass producers using deco style

£420.00

Large Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

Large Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

The geometric cut and polished design on an acid etched canvass is typical of Daum Nancy in the early 1920s

£550.00

Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

Art Deco Daum Nancy Vase c1930

Paul Daum the son son of Auguste daum lead the way in the field of art deco glass. Strong geometric designs on acid etched glass, with alternating bands of polishing and etching and quite distinctive

£440.00

Tall French Blue Cased & Cut Glass Vase c1920

Tall French Blue Cased & Cut Glass Vase c1920

An antique glass vase. A piece with an array of cutting styles incorperated in its design in a very usable size. A wonderful focal point for a room

£195.00

Art Deco WMF Ikora Glass Vase c1930

Art Deco WMF Ikora Glass Vase c1930

A superb art deco Ikora glass vase made in Germany in the 1930's. Ikora is a production line of WMF directed by Hugo Debach, Ikora was one of the names which pushed the art deco style into existence.

£95.00

Showing 1 to 10 of 10 (1 Pages)

Scottish Antiques © 2018 | Designed by Jarilo Design